Shooting Disciplines

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Trap

The shooter moves through five different stands along a shooting line at fifteen meters from where the clays exit. Each pull is for six shooters on the stand which means 5+1 of support.
From the moment the shooter braces the gun and takes aim, all the features of the shotgun come into play to guarantee an accurate target and a secure hold.
The shotgun is balanced to give a correct inertia of the shooter's movement and a correct distribution of the weights towards the muzzle.

Universal Trap

The shooter moves through five different stands along a shooting line at fifteen meters from where the clays exit. Each pull is for six shooters on the stand which means 5+1 of support.
From the moment the shooter braces the gun and takes aim, all the features of the shotgun come into play to guarantee an accurate target and a secure hold. The shotgun is balanced to give a correct inertia of the shooter's movement and a correct distribution of the weights towards the muzzle.

American Trap

The shooter in American trap does not change stands but moves to the next stand every five clays. For each turn there are five shooters on the stands. As in Olympic trap, in American trap the shooter starts holding the shotgun. The clay's short range needs a limited and precise movement of the shooter and a shotgun with considerable inertia, and therefore “heavy’’ barrels. The very high rib shape and the stock are the latest features that invite competitors to acquire the target while the clay rises.

D-Trap

The shooter shoots alternating between five different stands as in Olympic trap but he must shoot with two shots in the barrel. The two clays come out simultaneously with a fixed but divergent trajectory. The two clays are launched by two engines fixed at fifteen meters from the shooter clay exit.
The ideal shotgun is very similar to trap, with the only difference in the first barrel. A Mobilchoke® allows the shooter to choose for the first shot choke.  

Sporting

The newest shooting discipline is also the one which has the largest number of amatuers.
It is characterised by the variety of clays used (2 with two couples for each stand) to simulate the flight and movements of the traditional shooter's prey. They usually use smooth bore shotguns and pellet ammunition.
Sporting models with 20, 28, and 410 gauges are available.


Sporting shotguns characteristics
The shotguns developed for this discipline are characterised by some aspects:
Mobilchoke®: The variety of the clays creates the need to change the choke.
Point of balance: The distribution of the shotgun's weights is studied to have an almost neutral balance around the hinge rivet. This is to join a proper swing with target acquisition which is variable from clay to clay.
Stocks with drops to help to focus with the rib: The drop of the stocks are those with a thin comb, traditionally used for hunting, and the pistol grip which helps target acquisition and drive the hand towards the trigger.
Longer barrels: The Sporting barrels start from a minimum of 28” (71 cm) in 12 gauge. Recently, as the game has increased in complexity and the clays move further distances, barrels have grown to 32” (81 cm) long.


Skeet Electrocibles

The shooter shoots from eight different stands located along a semicircle of 13.20 m. radius to the poles. The clay pushing engines are located in two cages, one high on the left called pull and one on the right called mark. The Olympic Skeet allows the start without bracing the shotgun while the American Skeet stipulates the start bracing the shotgun. The shotguns for these two disciplines are different.
The one for Olympic Skeet needs light barrels to guarantee great rapidity in bracing and swinging. The stock, the pistol and the pad have a certain shape for these particular needs. For the American Skeet, not only is the shape of the stock and the pad different, but also the weight and the balance. In fact in this case, the shooter starts with the gun already braced.

The shooter shoots the electrocible which casually comes out from one of the five boxes located 25 meters away and the shooter must hit it before it crosses over the ring at 21 meters.
The distance between the shooter and the shooting box can be increased up to 28m if the competition is with handicaps.
The ideal shotgun for this discipline is characterised by a trap, with a traditional drop which permits the shooter to focus with the rib and the 71cm barrel. The first barrel is equipped with Mobilchoke® in order to allow for the best pellet distribution.